Beer and Food Pairing

14 August 2018

Pair Web

 

Red wine with red meat, white wine with fish, we all know that wine and food are a great team, their complimenting flavours adding to the overall experience, but I think it's fair to say that beer and food pairing is a much less well-known idea. But where to start? We've compiled a few links to help you out.

 

Beer tasting

Beer, like wine, comes in a huge variety of styles and within each style exist lots of beers each with subtle flavour differences. Being able to taste beer 'properly' and identify these flavours will make beer drinking a much more fulfilling experience. Learning to taste beer takes a little practice worth it. Watch this great tasting guide from the Craft Beer Channel -

Tasting Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpqRKLigVTw

Some terms to help you taste...

"Hops: 

Many times people use "hoppiness" to describe how bitter a beer tastes, but not all hoppy beers are bitter. The taste of a hoppy beer depends on when the hops are added in the brewing process. The earlier the hops are added, the more bitter the beer. Hops themselves have a versatile flavour and aroma that can enhance flowery and fruity flavours in the beer. Many breweries also rate how bitter a beer is with an IBU number. IBU stands for International Bitterness Units, and the higher the IBU, the stronger the bitterness.

Malt: 

Malt comes from the barley grain, and it is usually roasted before it is added to the brew. Roasting barley gives the beer a nutty flavour and a toasty aroma. Plus, during the roasting process, the sugars in the barley caramelize, bringing out a slightly sweet, caramel taste.

Dark: 

While it may seem more like a description of the colour, dark can also be used to describe how a beer tastes. Dark beers are made with malt grain that is roasted until it reaches a dark colour. Dark beers are typically roasted longer than malty beers, giving them a richer and heavier taste. The malt's nutty, caramel flavour turns to darker notes of chocolate and coffee with a longer roast time.

Light: 

Light beer is usually known for having a clean and crisp taste that is refreshing. Typically, light beers don't have a strong flavour and aren't very bitter or hoppy. As a result, most light beers also have a low alcohol content."

(The above from https://www.webstaurantstore.com/article/96/beer-and-food-pairings.html)

 

Beer pairing

Now to pair the beer with food. There's lots on the web but an easy online resource to help is this page from There's a Beer For That (https://www.beerforthat.com/beer-styles) it gives you a nice rounded summary of the type of beer, including possible food pairing .

Pizza 

Here are some basic tips...

"Contrast:

Pairing food with beer that has a contrasting flavour can be a dangerous game, but it can have big payoffs if done correctly. To make an ideal pairing by contrast, you want to pick a beer or dish that has one strong, dominant flavour, such as sweet, rich, or oily. If a dish has flavours that are too complex or mild, the flavours will muddle together. You want a dish that has a distinct taste that can shine through without being overpowered. An example of a good contrast pairing is oysters and stout. Oysters have a strong, briny flavour that can stand up to the rich and chocolatey flavour of the stout.

 

Complement:

Complementing flavours is one of the simplest ways to make a delicious food and beer pairing. Match rich foods with beers that have a heavy and rich flavour, like stouts or porters. Pair light-tasting salads and fish with light beers. Fruity and wheat beers are the perfect complement to desserts like fruit tarts.

 

Cleanse:

You can also use your beer as a palate cleanser. This type of pairing is ideal for dishes that have strong or overpowering flavours, like spicy Indian food or fatty fried food. For example, a nice pairing would be a light beer with spicy Korean fried chicken, as the refreshing beer provides needed relief from the heat. This pairing also works in the opposite way, and you can use fatty foods, such as French fries or nuts, to cut through the bitterness of an IPA.

 

Don't Overpower:

Keep in mind the levels of flavour in your food and beer. Many medium and dark beers have a rich and powerful flavour that can overpower certain types of food. For example, you wouldn't want to pair salmon with a pint of Guinness because the flavour of the beer will completely cover the taste of the fish."

(The above from https://www.webstaurantstore.com/article/96/beer-and-food-pairings.html)

 

This guide from the Brewers Association is also really useful and tells you all you need to know... https://www.brewersassociation.org/attachments/0000/2095/Beer_and_Food_Flyer_MDC.pdf

 

Curry

Some suggestions for our beers...

IPA / Smuggler / Zebedee - Roast chicken or pork, fish and chips, burgers, Sausage and Mash.

Roasted Nuts - Roast beef, smoked and barbecued meat. Cheese and biscuits.

Blonde - Chicken, salmon.

Gold - Great with spicy foods, peperoni pizza.

Red / Amber - Hearty foods, sausage, stews,

Lager - Chicken and fish dishes. Lighter foods.

24 Carat (Bottled) - Spicy food, curry or Mexican.

Black (Bottled) - Roasted or smoked foods. Stews

White (Bottled) - Classic with steamed mussels. Indian or Thai foods.

 

For further reading here's a nice article from the Telegraph. They have collaborated with Meantime Brewery but see what beers they mention and then convert to Rebellion beer that is closest to the style.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/food-and-drink/beer/forget-wine-time-match-food-beer/

 

Having said all of this you could just dive in, try different beers with different foods, see what works and what doesn't. Any rules are meant to be broken, there are surely some combinations that must be tasted to be believed.

 

Happy eating, drinking and exploring!

VIEW ALL AVAILABLE BEER

BEER AVAILABLE TODAY IN THE SHOP

 

IPA

Strength: 3.7%
Copper & easy drinking

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • 1 Litre Bottles
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  • 18 Pint Polycasks
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Peacemaker

Strength: 4.2%
Pale & Citrus

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • 1 Litre Bottles
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  • 5 Litre Kegs
  • 18 Pint Polycasks
  • 22 Pint Mini Barrel
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  • 72 Pint Firkins
 
 

Gold

Strength: 4.4%
Gold & hoppy

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • 1 Litre Bottles
  • 3 Litre Bottles
  • 5 Litre Kegs
  • 18 Pint Polycasks
  • 22 Pint Mini Barrel
  • 36 Pint Polypins
  • 72 Pint Firkins
 
 

Winter Royal

Strength: 5.4%
Ruby & warming

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • 1 Litre Bottles
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  • 22 Pint Mini Barrel
 
 

Lager

Strength: 4.4%
Crisp & refreshing

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • Single Bottle
  • Case of 12 Bottles
 
 

Roasted Nuts Extra

Strength: 5.8%
Deep ruby, complex & flavoursome

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • Single Bottle
  • Case of 12 Bottles
 
 

24 Carat

Strength:5%
Golden, hoppy & bittersweet

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • Single Bottle
  • Case of 12 Bottles
  • Mixed case 3 Beers
  • 2 Bottle + Glass Pack
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Blonde

Strength:4.3%
Golden & Refreshing

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • Single Bottle
  • Case of 12 Bottles
  • Mixed case 2 Beers
  • Mixed case 3 Beers
  • 2 Bottle + Glass Pack
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Red

Strength: 4.5%
Deep red & malty

 
Sizes Currently Available
  • Single Bottle
  • Case of 12 Bottles
  • Mixed case 2 Beers
  • Mixed case 3 Beers
  • 2 Bottle + Glass Pack
  • 3 Bottle Presentation Pack
  • 4 Bottle + Glass Pack
 
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